Discussion Paper: “Regime Proliferation and the Tragedy of the Global Institutional Commons” by Daniel W. Drezner

We have posted our first discussion paper of 2009. Prof. Daniel Drezner has kindly contributed “Regime Proliferation and the Tragedy of the Global Institutional Commons”. This paper examines the aftermath of the 2001 Doha Declaration on intellectual property rights and public health and recent efforts to create a weapons of mass destruction interdiction regime. It argues that “(a)fter a certain point, proliferation shifts global governance structures from rule-based outcomes to power-based outcomes – because institutional proliferation erodes the causal mechanisms through which regimes ostensibly strengthen international cooperation.”

 

This discussion also calls to mind a couple of papers which appeared in a symposium organized by the Cornell International Law Journal. In “Global Institutional Reform and Global Social Movements: From False Promise to Realistic Hope”, Richard W. Miller argues that the search for “institutional fixes” distracts from more productive discourse about improving global governance by thinking about global social movements. He describes existing social movements as “an international bunch of people” who seek to relieve the inequities and burdens of globalization, etc etc. They regard each other as allies, wish each other’s causes well, share information sources etc etc. Their purpose: presumably to change mindsets. Thus, in contrast to Drezner’s rationalist approach, Miller’s thesis appears rooted in constructivism. See (2006) 39 Cornell International Law Journal 501.

 

Robert Hockett in “Institutional Fixes versus Fixed Institutions” (2006) 39 Cornell International Law Journal 537 offers a bridge between the rationalist and the constructivist. He notes, “(a)n institution is often a kind of transition belt or drive shaft for the effectuation of social movements’ aims themselves; and it is, even more than that, structurally speaking a kind of blueprint for what the movement actually envisages as endpoint if that movement has fully theorized and specified what its ultimate aims are. We might liken the institution to a clutch or a drive shaft, and we might then liken the movement to an engine. Or we might say that the institution is the material embodiment of what the movement articulates by way of a blueprint for a better world.”

 

We hope to continue our discussion on regime proliferation and on the fragmentation of international law in the very near future.

 

Meanwhile, Dan Drezner’s paper may be found at http://fletcher.tufts.edu/FILA/pdf/FILADiscussionPaperNo0109.pdf.

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